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In the old days most PRs lived by the saying “good advertising is what you pay for, while good PR is what you pray for”.  Rightly or wrongly, we believed target audiences paid more attention to the ‘free’ company mentions that PR generates within editorial sections of the media than the paid adverts in the same titles.

From white papers, blogs and guest articles, to case studies, analyst research and product reviews, B2B technology marketing is dedicated to the creation and dissemination of huge swathes of content. Yet despite it all, 80% of IT decision makers say it’s a challenge finding information that's actually useful, according to a survey report by IDG Enterprise. Evidently our content marketing is misfiring and doesn't show tech buyers the understanding and love they're crying out for.

If you’re a B2B tech marketer, you’ll know it’s tough to get the media to write news stories about your new products.  Unless you’re Microsoft, Google, SAP etc – or your new product is a ‘world’s first’ (or involves a genuine step up in innovation) - corporate IT publications are unlikely to want to cover your launch.  It's frustrating. So what are the options for generating product PR?

Facebook and Twitter were awash with shares, Likes, tweets and RTs about the UK’s EU referendum in the run up to the vote.   In fact there were nearly 6 million social interactions with the official social pages for the Vote Leave and Britain Stronger in Europe campaigns in the 30 days prior to the big day.  So was all this social sharing and interaction useful? Did it inform people’s understanding? Or just add to everyone’s confusion?

Social sharing through the likes of Facebook and Twitter has helped Brits better understand the issues underpinning the EU referendum vote according to a national survey. Maybe that's not a surprise, but the research also found that some people actually changed how they were going to vote based on information they've seen on social media.