Media Relations

In the old days most PRs lived by the saying “good advertising is what you pay for, while good PR is what you pray for”.  Rightly or wrongly, we believed target audiences paid more attention to the ‘free’ company mentions that PR generates within editorial sections of the media than the paid adverts in the same titles.

If you’re a B2B tech marketer, you’ll know it’s tough to get the media to write news stories about your new products.  Unless you’re Microsoft, Google, SAP etc – or your new product is a ‘world’s first’ (or involves a genuine step up in innovation) - corporate IT publications are unlikely to want to cover your launch.  It's frustrating. So what are the options for generating product PR?

Social sharing through the likes of Facebook and Twitter has helped Brits better understand the issues underpinning the EU referendum vote according to a national survey. Maybe that's not a surprise, but the research also found that some people actually changed how they were going to vote based on information they've seen on social media.

I chuckled when I saw that at least three British politicians took a pounding in the media recently for trying to cash in on the current buzz surrounding Leicester City FC’s shock Premier League title win. The message is clear: if you’re a high profile brand (whether an MP, business chief or company) stay away from football and topics that people feel passionately about, unless you can be 100% authentic.

In January Google made a change to the way it orders and ranks search results, providing some interesting insights for PRs and Publishers.  Briefly, early analysis of this update (labelled Google’s core update) indicates that articles in online publications are being given a boost in search results if they are ‘timeless pieces’ that cover topics in depth. Shorter ‘newsie’ pieces are more likely to drop down in searches once they are no longer topical.